Apply Online for CSD’s Popular Dual-Language Immersion Programs

Did you know that Canyons District has some of the most extensive language immersion offerings in Utah? Twenty-one elementary and secondary schools offer dual-language immersion programs in Spanish, French, or Chinese — and it’s nearly time to apply to enroll for the 2022-2023 school year.

The start of October signals the opening of the window to apply for CSD’s popular Dual Language Immersion Programs. Parents and guardians can apply online anytime from Monday, Oct. 4, 2021 to Nov. 23, 2021.

In addition, families interested in learning about these programs are invited to attend an informational meeting for parents. The meeting will be held on Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021 from 6-8 p.m. in the Canyons Center at the Canyons District Office, 9361 S. 300 East in Sandy.

Please note: Students with siblings who are currently enrolled in one of CSD’s DLI  schools must still submit applications by the Nov. 23, 2021 deadline. A lottery will be held to determine entrance into the programs if the number of applicants exceeds the 56 seats available per entering class.

On the application, parents will be asked to list their top three choices for placement. Parents will be notified of their children’s offer for placement into a program or placement on a waitlist by Jan. 7, 2022. All, but the program offered at Midvale Elementary, are for students entering first grade in 2022-2023.

The program at Midvale Elementary starts in kindergarten. Due to the fact that enrollment at Midvale Elementary is at-capacity, that school’s program is only open to students who live within the school’s boundaries.  Applications for Midvale’s Dual Language Immersion program will be handled through the school.

Spanish is offered at Alta View, Altara, Midvalley and Silver Mesa. French is offered at Butler Elementary and Oak Hollow. The schools offering Mandarin are Draper Elementary, Lone Peak, and Ridgecrest.

Immersion programs, a model of bilingual education dating back to the 1960s,  are surfacing in classrooms around the globe as an efficient path to proficiency in a world language. Elementary students in dual language immersion programs spend half the day learning core subjects in English and the other half learning in a target language.

CSD’s first immersion classes opened in 2009, the same year that the District was founded. More than 10 percent of CSD’s 34,000 students are now learning a world language through the program, which extends through high school. Students who pass an Advanced Placement exam in the 9th or 10th grades can start taking college-level courses for early college credit.

Questions? Call the Instructional Supports Department at 801-826-5026.

You’re busy, and want to get involved in your child’s school. Where should you start?

Dr. Angela Wilkinson, Sunrise Elementary Principal.
Dr. Angela Wilkinson, Sunrise Elementary Principal.

It’s been said that parents are their child’s first, and most important, teacher — a truism reinforced by research showing how important a strong school-to-home connection is to student success.

But what does it mean to be involved in your child’s education? Parents are busy and can’t do it all: check the backpack, monitor all of their children’s daily assignments, help with homework, attend school events, and volunteer in the classroom. So, where should they start? What questions should they be asking? How can they make the most of parent-teacher conferences? What barriers, fears, or misunderstandings get in the way of parents and teachers working together to help kids thrive?

Last year, Connect Canyons interviewed some PTA representatives to discuss the many ways families can connect with their neighborhood school.  This year, we decided to get the perspective of a school principal: Sunrise Elementary Principal Dr. Angela Wilkinson.

Speaking from her perspective as a career educator, Dr. Wilkinson shared some of the ways Canyons District schools are building bridges with families. During the pandemic, for example, schools found ways to host parent-teacher conferences remotely, which actually helped boost participation. It’s a time-saving innovation that schools are still putting to use this year.

Dr. Wilkinson also offered great insight into how parents can focus their efforts, even touching on questions parents should be asking to understand how their children’s learning is progressing so they can better support learning at home.

After all, it’s one thing to help with homework. It’s another to know that your child is missing foundational concepts — such as memorizing “math facts” (addition, subtraction and times tables) — so you can spend your time on what matters most.

“We appreciate parent involvement in the schools. We couldn’t do it without our parent volunteers,” Dr. Wilkinson said. “Last year with our not being to have volunteers in the buildings [due to state COVID19-related health protocols], it’s made you appreciate it even more.”

CSD Makes Plans to Create Own Social-Emotional Learning Curriculum

Canyons Superintendent Dr. Rick Robins at the Tuesday, Sept. 21 meeting of the Canyons Board of Education announced an administrative action to suspend the use of the current social-emotional curriculum being used in Canyons District elementary and middle schools.

While reiterating his support of social-emotional learning, Dr. Robins stressed that the plan isn’t to abandon the teaching of crucial life skills and character traits, but to improve upon the curriculum being used in Canyons’ schools.

The current curriculum, called “Second Step” will be on hold until Tuesday, Oct. 5, when Board members and the Administration can fully discuss the issue after it has been appropriately noticed on a public-meeting agenda.

At that Board meeting, the Administration intends to propose a timeline for the creation of Canyons’ own curriculum by in-house instructional experts.

“Since the onset of the pandemic, with the Board’s and Administration’s steadfast commitment to in-person learning, Canyons District has prioritized not only the physical safety of students but also their social and emotional needs,” Superintendent Dr. Rick Robins says. “This past year has brought new challenges with the spread of new COVID-19 variants and shifting health guidance. But our goal of supporting students’ overall wellness has been consistent throughout, and something I continue to wholeheartedly support.”

The philosophy behind social-emotional learning, which is required by Utah State Board of Education rule, is to engender trust, respect, and unity. But the District is finding that the Second Step curriculum, although supported by many, has links to information that may not meet the community’s expectations and needs.

Pending Board approval, Robins hopes to have an in-house social-emotional curriculum completed by the end of winter break or early January.

More information about CSD’s next steps will be made available after decisions are made about the SEL curriculum that will be provided in CSD schools.

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